Tag Archive | laurea

First step: backwards

It was the morning of our second school day at Laurea, and the coffee line was long. We sat in the cafe with a classmate and watched the line getting longer and longer. In a few minutes, we had come up with a solution to improve the situation. Or so we thought.

When our first Design Thinking class started and we got our assignment, we were thrilled. We were supposed to think how to make Laurea a better place to study, which meant we would have the chance to put our coffee line solution into practice on the spot.

We started mindmapping and deepening the idea and were pretty far with our improved spatial design when our teacher Gijs van Wulfen came to interrupt us. “Take a step back. You are already finding a solution and you haven’t even defined what the campus actually consists of.”

Oh. Right. A step back.

When we finalized our task the next day, the coffee line problem was solved. But so were many, many other things that actually affect the atmosphere on the campus even more. To me, the most valuable lesson of the Design Thinking course was just that: take a step back, look at the big picture first. That’s how you can innovate something, not just improve existing solutions.

And innovation is what Design Thinking is all about. Our workshop facilitator and the author of the article Design Thinking as an effective Toolkit for Innovation Katja Tschimmel describes Design Thinking as an abductive thinking, which is “thinking in new and different perspectives and about future possibilities, which do not fit into existing models”. This requires some perceptive cognition. In other words, taking a step back.

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Service Design Breakfast #6: Service Acceptance Boosted by E-learning by Jouni Tuominiemi, HiQ

In the sixth Service Design Breakfast on 28th of November 2012, Jouni Tuominiemi, HiQ, started with a long introduction about his company and about his background. Later on he opened up E-learning topic. He pointed out that nowadays the traditional view about e-learning has changed. It is not anymore virtual classroom sessions but it also covers interactive study materials, social media and done in physical classroom and in help of tutor / instructor. He told that e-learning as a term is an old fashion way of naming things, and it should be used as such due to fact of video contents or social media interactions. He opened the abbreviation LMS, telling that nowadays whole e-learning systems are integrated together under Learning Management Systems, which supposed to be a central management unit.


Figure 1:
LMS, HiQ 2012

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Service Design meets Futures thinking # 3

A research based series of posts discussing the statement “Futures Research supports the Service Design process in multiple ways and throughout the whole process” by Minna Koskelo and Anu K. Nousiainen.

Part #3: The Process Perspective

Our two previous blog entries have been summarizing the purpose of our study and the main findings including the synergies of service design and futures thinking, thus why it is beneficial for the two disciplines utilize approach and methods from one another and learn from each other. This third post introduces Service Design Process that is enhanced by futures thinking. Additionally we illustrate how service design thinking benefits foresight process.

The big picture: Becoming a human-centric innovative trendsetter

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Service Design Breakfast #5: There is no such a thing as service design by Anton Schubert

Fifth talk, 28.11.2012

 

With a twenty-five year career experience in design, ex IDEO employee, the Head of product & service design at 358 Anton Schubert says: “there’s no such thing as service design”.

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Competing with Business Models

“If you are not thinking about business models, you are an irresponsible leader.”

Co-author of Business Model Generation (Osterwalder & Pigneur, 2010) Alexander Osterwalder challenged Finnish business experts in Business Model Innovation Seminar in Helsinki 6th of November 2012.  He stated business models makes organizations thrive or die.

“We will have more industries where companies compete with different business models, but with exactly same products”, and continued: “Nowadays we compete with our business models.”

From Nintendo Wii to Nespresso , Alexander Osterwalder proved his case. “A better business model almost always outcomes a better technology.” he pointed out, and also added in the case of Nespresso: “Business models also expire”. Continue reading

Service Design meets Futures Thinking – IN ACTION

Before our 2nd blog post for the series of Service Design meets Futures Thinking, we have a special news for you !

The first test environment for combining Futures Thinking with Design Thinking takes place in Helsinki in two weeks ! This is an invitation to all design thinkers, futures thinkers, strategic minds and innovative leaders to take part in the day on Friday 9th November at the heart of Helsinki, Finland – The World Design Capital 2012.

LaFutura is here ! Continue reading

Service Design meets Futures Thinking

A series of posts discussing the statement “Futures Research supports the Service Design process in multiple ways and throughout the whole process”. Part #1: Conclusions based on the first round of literature review
by Minna Koskelo and Anu K. Nousiainen.

This is the first post by the authors regarding the “Service Design meets Futures Thinking” research that they have conducted in summer 2012.

During our Master’s Degree studies of Service Design and Innovation at Laurea University of Applied Sciences we noticed that Futures Research was lightly covered in the literature of (Service) Design Thinking and related practices. Since both of us have a professional background in Strategic Foresight in the private sector we knew that Futures Research can be utilized especially for innovation and for identifying new business opportunities. Therefore, we decided to investigate the topic and our assumption in order to explain how these fields can benefit and supplement one another. Continue reading