Tag Archive | experience

“Memorable experiences, meaningful life”. But what is an experience, exactly?

Aalto Experience platform fosters and promotes a multi-disciplinary approach to understanding and designing for experiences by combining scientific, artistic, business, and technological angles to human experiences.”


13th February marked the day of the Aalto Experience Platform Kick-off. With the mission of making Aalto University a world leader in multidisciplinary experience research, Experience Platform is an open community for experience research. Besides a brief introduction on the platform itself and networking, the kick-off offered insights on some of the multifaceted approaches to experience research by presentations on User Experience, Citizen Experience, and Consumer Experience.

What is an experience?

In their opening intro session Markus Ahola (Project Manager, Aalto University) and Virpi Roto (Professor in Experience Design, Aalto University) started head-on by addressing the not-so-simple question of What is an experience. Not surprisingly there was no conclusive answer but a mixture of responses and definitions by the multidisciplinary Experience Platform academic board members – each of them giving a different perspective to demonstrate the complexity of the question on a video that was shown.

A general trend behind the research and the Experience Platform seemed to be the growing investments (not only monetary) in experiences while material possessions are being less and less valued. Through my human-centered and soft-value-focused glasses the slogan of the platform “Memorable experiences, meaningful life” seemed like a breath of fresh air in the often cold and money-focused world of ours. On a practical side, it was also interesting and inspiring to hear that the platform will have a physical, multidisciplinary working space after the summer.

Hannu Seristö, Vice President External relations at Aalto University also gave a short speech about human-centricity being needed not only in business but also in the public sector while pointing out that humans have not exactly been in center of business traditionally. However, times are changing, and with that feelings and experience, and particularly ease of buying, continue to be increasingly important.

Who do we design for?


With that it was time for Kristina Höök, Professor in interaction design at KTH Sweden to step on stage for her presentation on User Experience – designing with aesthetics through bodily and emotional engagements. Her presentation content and style was exactly what the Experience Platform introduction highlighted in their operation in general: human, brave, and crazy. At times provocative (and in my opinion, in a good way: keeping the audience interested, trying to shake us a little and question our own beliefs), her presentation gave plenty of examples on the importance of movement and of understanding oneself first in order to design for a (separate) end-user. Movement was not a focus in design I had previously, in all honesty, thought about too much – except for e.g. potential limitations in one’s moving that might affect a service perhaps. But following the presentation it made sense and I found myself reflecting on many thought-provoking parts of the presentation.

From the service designer point of view one of the most memorable parts of Kristina’s presentation was the statement “you can’t design for someone else if you don’t know how it is or how it feels yourself”. This statement at first sounded to me almost as the total opposite of empathy and putting oneself in the other one’s (=end-user’s) shoes – traditionally one of service design’s main guidelines! And that made me think: fine, if one is naturally emphatic and would consider the other and their needs, wishes etc. naturally anyway, but what if the designer is a selfish one with no regard of other points of views than their own? However, throughout the rest of the presentation the point became clearer and actually was very close to, not the opposite of, empathy: using oneself as the end-user, researcher, designer at the same time, but through empathy and compassion. Perhaps for a more traditionally scientific research field this could be provocative in a totally different way, as one of Kristina’s main points was “research through design” – not having research done separately and in isolation, then followed by design based on the results. Another interesting point was the interest in designing things that are not only reading your emotions but create technology to make people experience new things about themselves and their body – not just things like like facial recognition or counting your steps. In hindsight this had a nice connection also to the following presentation from Anne Stenroos, Chief Design Officer at City of Helsinki, who also spoke about the shift from high-tech to human-tech. Add a Feldenkreis video with a baby and a sitting bone exercise and you’ve got the most interactive and perhaps memorable presentation of the kick-off.

Citizen Experience – From Audience to Actor


Next up was then Anne Stenros from City of Helsinki. Her presentation was around citizen experience and in particular the shift from audience to actor: city-users becoming city-makers. Her quirky and well-spoken style was a hit in my opinion, with her topic being both fascinating and well-presented. She went through some current trends and emerging signals of the city universe and the citizen experience, with a note of human-centricity visible in each scenario. This presentation too arose many thoughts and reflection as well as shared practical examples of some of the trends already visible in the city design today. Personally I was a little relieved to hear that the era of “Smart city” was about to transform to “Responsive city” – reinforcing the previous presenter’s point in the shift from high-tech to human-tech. According to Anne, the shift was about responding to needs of citizens rather than optimizing technology for users.

A brief look into the trends in consumer experience

Lastly, Eric Arnould, Professor in Marketing in Aalto University gave a presentation about consumer experience based on the perspective of theory. Some of this was familiar from the service design studies but it was a good recap nevertheless. A groundbreaking thought in 1982, consumption not being about making rational choices but about “fantasies, feelings & fun”, was a good reminder on how things have indeed changed from consumption being seen as a purely economic exchange like it had been by marketing thus far. The presentation discussed some perspectives on defining ‘experience’, for example highlighting the narrative, material, social and political aspects and on the other hand the cultural, situated and relational nature of experiences. In the end though for me the thing that made me think the most was actually in the Q&A session after the presentation, when an attendee asked Eric about his thoughts on the “new work” and new work spaces. “Consumerification of work”, aka new work spaces that look like leisure-time or consumer space, was a concept that I would like to continue to ponder on also after the event.

Topped with circus performances, demos and some snacks, the event was a wonderful experience. Now we just have to figure out how to define ‘experience’…

The author Kaisla Saastamoinen is a Service Design Masters student with a passion for human-centric design, co-creation and coffee.

Service Experience Camp, Berlin 2014

Service Experience Camp 2014 (SXC14) was a two day camp organized by Berlin based service designers on September 13 and 14, 2014. More than 200 service designers, experts, students, and enthusiasts from various countries participated in the event. The theme for SXC2014 was ”Bringing Services To Life”. The focus of the camp was on the implementation of the service design principals in various industries.

The camp activities were divided into three parts:

Keynote sessions, where industry experts shared their service experience with the entire audience. There were few keynote sessions lined up every morning and evening.

Bar camp sessions were the back bone of the event. In bar camps, experts presented/co-created a service experience session with a small group of audience. Any one could nominate to host a bar camp or participate in one.

Networking sessions were the third part. During lunch and coffee breaks and in the evening after the closing of the bar camp session, participants mingled together and exchanged thoughts.

SXC14 had an Android and iPhone app with information about the sessions, map of the facility, lunch timings, and other information. The app was built by Futurice in just two weeks using the agile software development principals.


Screenshot of the SXC14 application.

Keynote sessions

Many experts from various industries were at SXC14 to share their experiences on Service Design implementation.  Below are the some topics I found interesting.

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Gamification: A Quick Introduction

Games have been always known for their immersive and engaging experiences. These experiences normally challenge players to spend huge amount of time and efforts playing games, in return of gaining that sense of pleasure, mastery and progression that games generate in the player mind.

Building on the strength of games, the term gamifiaciton have been coined where businesses have started applying game thinking, design and tools in non-game contexts for the sake of achieving certain business objectives.

The business objectives from gamifiaciton can vary from increasing customer engagement, building relationships with customers, creating more joyful brand experiences and last but not least influencing and changing customer behaviors.

At its core, gamifiaciton is the same when it comes to the thinking, tools and methods with the difference is why it’s applied and where it’s applied, when comparing it to games.

The aim of this post is to walk you through a brief introduction on gamifiaciton and how it can be used as way to design engaging experiences. The knowledge provided here is based on the material provided in an online Massive Online Open Course (MOOC), which was provided by Coursera on the topic.

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Book Review: New Service Development: Creating Memorable Experiences (Fitzsimmons J.A. & Fitzsimmons M.J., 2000, Thousand Oak, Sage)

I pass by specialized coffee shop daily when going to lunch. Well, I don’t just pass by. It is the place for me to enjoy quality coffee, good service and relax before heading back to the office. It is my sanctuary which I have managed to fit to my daily routines. It just has something that the coffee shop next to it doesn’t have. Reflecting to personal experiences for buying a coffee from the specialized coffee shop, it has limited selection of tea’s, coffee beans and truffles. Coffee is made based on daily selection or based on customer selection. Each customer is served personally and there is social interaction between the customer and barman. So it is not just about the coffee or tea. Here can be identified use environment where the service is used, customer participation when there is selection to choose from and social interaction between the service user and service provider. Regular visitors don’t mind about queuing because they know they get personal and good service. Even though when the action stays the same, other variables bring new elements to the experience and this makes it memorable.

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