Tag Archive | co-creation

Design Thinking big bang!

“Here was a curious thing. My friend’s instinct told him the North End was a good place, and his social statistics confirmed it. But everything he had learned as a physical planner about what is good for people and good for cities neighbourhoods, everything that made him an expert, told him the North End had to be a bad place.” Jane Jacobs, The Death and Life of Great American Cities.

Change by Design [1]

In the very first masterclasses about Design Thinking running by Katja Tschimmel and Marina Valenca we, toddlers in the field and students in Service Innovation and Design Programme, went into renaissance era of the design which now is perceived and used as a perfectly crafted methodology by a wider audience including business itself. Big Bang of Design Thinking which – as we were assured – Comes of Age! [2] As lectures went fast with a short history of design and presented different approaches to the design process to smoothly show us their own – well equipped with a whole range of precisely picked tools [3]; like many others, I was waiting for practical part of the meeting. For doing stuff not learning about it, to experience it, to feel it in my heart and to answer fundamental questions: what is, what if, what wows and what works [4]. After all, I took home some thoughts which I present below.

Omnipresent visualisation

If you were asked to describe DT you probably would start drawing something, using Post-its notes, prototyping anything but not words themselves. Visualisation played a priority during our jam session. There is no way to disagree with Liedtka & Ogilvie that “Visualisation make ideas tangible and concrete. […] make them human and real.” [4] It also allows us to avoid misunderstanding and misinterpretation. After that few hours together it is hard to polemise with Katja while saying that “designers analyse and understand problems of the artificial world.” in the meaning that every tangible aspect of the performance was before the creation of intangible thoughts, ideas, notions, and intuition. From this perspective visualisation lets us grab our unrevealed ideas, bring them to the surface and make them enough concrete to evaluate. It also put individual and collective intuition before learning and maybe this is what I the most love about it.

A stream of consciousness. 

If I were asked to show the greatest values of Design Thinking process, I would say that its collaborative, multidisciplinary and co – creative aspects are the most precious one. I enjoyed brain-writing part of our session vastly. But, we always put a human in the heart of all “doing”. In Virginia Woolf’s book the different aspects of Ms. Dalloway; her needs, feelings, context, and experiences are constantly subjected to individual and collective influence and turn from intentions into reality. In DT process it all above makes possible to arise great and innovative idea anchored in the essence of an end user of the service or offering.

Secret Ingredient

Nevertheless to make it happen, I learned that we need to listen to others with engagement on every possible step. In my opinion, like visualisation is the tool of understanding and expressing all ideas and thoughts as listening is the value without which no meaningful idea can authentically bloom. I like how about listening speaks Otto Scharmer and I leave you with his short video to contemplate where innovation and tipping point in any sector starts. Enjoy!

Marta Kuroszczyk

Sources:
1. “Change by design: How Design Thinking Transforms Organizations and Inspires Innovation.” Tim Brown

2. “Design Thinking Comes to Age”, Jan Kolko Harvard Bussiness Review, https://hbr.org/2015/09/design-thinking-comes-of-age

3. “Design Thinking as an effective Toolkit for Innovation.”, Katja Tschimmel http://www.academia.edu/1906407/Design_Thinking_as_an_effective_Toolkit_for_Innovation

4. “Designing for Growth: A Design Thinking Tool Kit for Managers.”, Liedtka & Ogilvie

Getting in the mood for Design Thinking

As far as Design Thinking goes, I must confess to being quite the “newbie”. Having only recently been enlightened to the magical world of service design, innovation and co-creation, I was excited to learn of the many different models that the design thinking world has to offer.

Katja Tschimmel describes the similarities and differences of the models in both her article “Design Thinking as an effective Toolkit for Innovation” as well as in the research report D-think. These include IDEO’s 3 I model (Inspiration, Ideation, Implementation), IDEO’s HCD model (human-centred design, Hearing, Creating, Delivering), the models of the d.school (Hasso-Plattner Institute and Stanford University), the Double-Diamond model of the British Council, and the DT toolkit for Educators. Mindshake’s E6 model was also introduced, and I got the opportunity to try it out myself during the course.file-25-09-16-17-59-47-1

During the class sessions, I got a glimpse of how the design thinking process could be applied to solve student-related issues. There was no lack of empathy during this task, as we all dived into tackling issues concerning thesis stress, time-management issues and networking needs.  We grouped ourselves into small multidisciplinary teams, and our team went through a the Design Thinking process to come up with our final conclusion; a service called “Matchup”. It was a service to tackle the issue of networking within our SID group.  The idea actually won!

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Design Thinking – from brain errors to innovations

Have you ever been in a situation when you know your business isn’t going as smoothly as it should? You know that something should be done but you don’t know where to start or can’t identify the business problems or the customers’ needs? How do you feel about failure as a part of innovating? Have you ever thought about establishing an innovation process WITH your customers instead of old fashioned way, FOR your customers? Are you confused?

These are all questions that pop up when talking about Design Thinking (DT).

What is it and how can it help to develop your business?

Design Thinking combines human-centricity and design methods with problem solving and innovation process. It focuses in organization’s ability to produce new content, develop business and make development work cross sectoral and organizational boundaries. DT’s core is located somewhere between human-centered approach, collaborative way of working and co-creation with stakeholders and the end-users.

The work itself takes place in multidisciplinary teams that are facilitated by designers whose expertise consists of the ability to match human needs with technical resources, constrains and objectives of the project or business, and ultimately conversion into customer value and market opportunity by using different DT process and tools. In DT feelings and emotions as well as failures and mistakes plays big role when achieving the results like new processes, services and ways of communication and collaboration.

There are multiple different Design Thinking process models that can be used. The choice depends on various factors, e.g. the characteristics of the innovation project and its context, the team dynamics and the time available for the process. There’s no such thing as a perfect DT process model and pioneers in the field all have their own opinions.

Design Thinking in practice

We had two-day intensive DT workshop where we concentrated on Evolution 62 model developed by Katja Tschimmel in 2015. The name of the process model refers to the six phases that all start with the letter E:

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Playfull innovation

Play has evolved as an advantageous and necessary aspect of behaviour. Why is it then that we so often leave it on other side of the office door? (Michlewski & Buchanan, 2016)

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The power of Design Thinking

Design Thinking is as a creative way of thinking which leads to transformation and evolution of new forms of living and to new ways of managing business. Designers not only develop innovative solutions by working in teams with colleagues and partners, but also in collaboration with the final users.

Its visual tools (drawing, sketching, mapping, prototyping, brainstorm, etc) help professionals to identify, visualize, solve problems and preview problems in innovative ways. Enable designer inquire about a future situation or solution to a problem and transform unrealized ideas into something to build on and to discuss with colleagues, final customers and other stakeholders.

Design Thinking characteristics are analytical and emphatic, rational and emotional, methodical and intuitive, oriented by plans and constraints, but spontaneous.

Models

Several process models have been presented. The criteria used to choose the more appropriate model include the characteristics of the task, its context, the number and composition of the team and its dynamic and the available time for the innovation process.

Some examples are: IDEO’s 3 I and HCD Models; Model of the Hasso-Plattner Institute; 4 D or Double Diamond Model of the British Council; Service Design Thinking (SDT) Model; Evolution 6² Model.

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Hackathon Kickstart / Day 1

On 21st of January Futurice and Kiinteistömaailma organized Service Design Hackathon in Helsinki. I get to participate first time in my life for such a happening. It is all very exciting, as I never heard of “Hackathon” before! Young creative and business minded people have arrived to Annakatu 32, to building called “Kamppi´s top end”. On the very last ( 8th) floor situates Futurice´s colourful office, full of creative atmosphere. It has been one of the coldest winter day in Helsinki,almost -20 degrees, so first of all I must get rid of my winter clothes before I enter for this new challenge. Few young programmer-looking guys are preparing some cappuccinos in the kitchen area, people are chatting with each other; everyone seems to be ready to hit the Hackathon!

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Erkki Heikkinen, Kiinteistömaailma

Programme started with CEO of Kiinteistömaailma, Erkki Heikkinen´s speech. He told us about Kiinteistömaailma´s strategy and history. We got to talk about today´s megatrends of housing and goals, which Kiinteistömaailma wants to reach. Hackathon is here to help them to innovate and create new services with service design methods. It is here to create something inventive and urban. Maybe it ends up even for “Tinder of Living”, who knows! We all know that way of housing and living is going through some major turning points these days. Aging, immigration, urbanization and community housing are not only trends of 21st century but also facts we need to take in to consideration.

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Risto Sarvas, Lean Service Creation procedure

Risto Sarvas, Creative Director from Futurice introduce us to so-called Service Creation checklist. What should you check before you start building up a service? First of all, “you can´t plan the future, you need to build it!” was Risto´s starting point. “And as you can´t know what you build, you need to experiment, fail & learn”. “Always find a problem worth of solving as value is in the iteration” adds Risto. “Love the problem, not solution as solutions you can always change!”. Was fascinating to realize that this is exactly what I have been studying the whole last semester in Laurea. So this is it- Service Design in real life!

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What is your mood today?

Hackathon is working together. We audience were sorted in to groups by choosing different colour post-it. I choose orange: colour for visual mood. As an artist background it seems to be easiest choice for me always. Each group should have at least one post-it colour mood: business, technology, visual and human. Once we were into groups we had to choose a topic of Kiinteistömaailma´s one strategy options. Our group choose “Service of living in the future – 2020?”.

 

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We talked about lot of today’s technology contra people´s wishes of presence. Technology is taking place of daily life. It has it´s good sides but also bad ones. So we started to look our topic from “how people will like to live in the future” point of view. We figured out several good ideas, which I of course won’t tell you yet 🙂 ! Hackthon has started in our group; we hanged our idea boards on the wall – grabbed post-its and pens. Creative ideas started to fly around our table.

To be continued Day 2. (29.-30.1.2016)

Written by Paula Nordfors – Laurea, Helsinki, Finland

How soft is business ecosystem creation?

Electric vehicles (EV) seem to be the only reasonable future replacement for what we call car today. Everyone seems to agree on that. Still, the amount of EVs on the streets is still quite close to peanuts. The reason for that is the lack of a supporting service ecosystem, i.e. the fact that the “tipping point” has not been reached yet. The Tekes project EV-ACTE has investigated the role of the soft strategies in creation of an ecosystem around EVs. The project researchers have recently reported results in a series of interesting presentations. The two concrete examples of soft strategies that the EV-ACTE project researchers have studied are affective influence and narratives.

Doing is better than talking

Affective influence is a process of actively influencing people’s affective reactions. One way this could be done is through embodied affective influence. E.g. instead of “doing a lot of political talk” (Vuori, Huy 2015) to the decision makers in the EV ecosystem, one puts them e.g. into a real driver’s seat and lets them test drive an EV themselves. What is said is left to the recipient of the information to interpret and a lot of things remain unclarified. This in turn leads to making decisions under uncertainty. As shown by Laureiro’s presentation (2015) this falls into a mode of exploration, i.e. a mode where decision maker needs to think long term, plan, be creative and exercise more dynamic behavior switching. This is proven to take a lot of human brain’s energy and is therefore not so easy to do (Laureiro, 2015). On the other hand, by experiencing e.g. driving an EV first hand, one can reduce the feeling of uncertainty and shift the decision making into the mode of exploitation. This is mode where one needs to deal with incremental changes and decisions, and engages different parts of the brain, the ones that deal with learning, memory, and persistence, which seems to consume less energy and is therefore easier to do.

If you have to talk – do it with passion

Another way to build affective influence is through using rich and vivid language that is close to the regular human being, as opposed to using “analytical information and getting the facts straight” (Vuori, Huy 2015). Narratives, as explained by Gustafsson and Rowell (2015) are “how we interpret the world”. Established car makers, for example, interpret the world of EVs as “the next step in vehicle production”. For Tesla, on the other hand, EVs are “innovation in batteries and energy that can be applied to any product” (Gustafsson, Rowell 2015). There seems to be a slight difference, right?

EVNarratives

Venture narratives of established car makers vs. disruptor (Gustafsson & Rowel, 2015)

Co-produce, rather than blindly show the way

Yet another way to build affective influence is by generating perceptions of participation with different stakeholders, as opposite of being explicit of company’s own top-down dominance and others being followers. This also strongly resonates with service logic which has service co-production with the customer as one of the fundamental principles (Lusch & Vargo, 2014).

It is proven – it pays off to be soft!

Both of the researched company clusters had nearly equal starting points, and had promising businesses in the beginning. However the companies that adopted affective influence approaches managed to attract more partners and thereby to build a business ecosystem than the ones that did not “care” about affective influence. Some of the partners simply stopped working with the later and started working with the “emotional” and “passionate” company. This, although indirectly, also serves as a validation to some of the service logic principles. It pays off to be soft!

 

AffectualInfluence

Influencing business ecosystem creation process by means of affective influence (Vuori&Huy 2015)

Sources:

Timo Vuori, Quy Huy (2015). Affective Influence in Ecosystem Creation, in Soft Strategies in Business Ecosystem Creation: Narratives, Cognition and Emotions workshop, November

Robin Gustafsson (2015). Venture Narrative Strategies in Emerging Ecosystems, in Soft Strategies in Business Ecosystem Creation: Narratives, Cognition and Emotions workshop, November

Daniella Laureiro-Martinez (2015). Strategists’ brains: cognitive neuroscience and strategic management, in Soft Strategies in Business Ecosystem Creation: Narratives, Cognition and Emotions workshop, November

Lusch, Robert F.& Vargo, Stephen L. (2014). Service-Dominant Logic. Premises, Perspectives, Possibilities. Cambridge University Press, UK

 

Public and Private Sector into Cooperation for Better Services and Innovations

I attended a seminar organised by CIDe Cluster Finland in Laurea´s Tikkurila campus. CIDe Cluster is a joint project of Laurea University of Applied Sciences and Vantaan Innovaatioinstituutti Oy (Innovation Institute of Vantaa, Inc.). It focuses on the development of products and services promoting good care and rehabilitation. CIDe Cluster brings together health care and well-being companies, public sector organizations and other community players to create business development and innovation know-how. CIDe Cluster offers their partners networking events and welfare business and welfare technology trainings.

Don’t fear the restructuring

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Jari Koskinen, the Association of Finnish Local and Regional Authorites

CEO Jari Koskinen of the Association of Finnish Local and Regional Authorities opened his speech by saying that the Finnish administrative structure is moving towards the European model – state, autonomous areas (countries) and municipalities – with the new Social welfare and Healthcare reform. His opinion is that when planning those reforms, one should keep in mind the number of inhabitants in Finland. Not only was he comparing Finland to France where he, still as a spokesman of the Päijät-Häme region, wanted to create a partnership with one of the northern regions of France, but while the Finnish one had 200,000 residents, the French equivalent had over four million! Understandable, the French were not enthusiastic about a joint action. He also compared the Finnish regions with one another – Keski-Pohjamaa having 70,000 inhabitants, and Uusimaa getting close to two million! His message was “How do you divide the responsibilities in the upcoming reform if the autonomous regions aren´t homogenous?” He noted that there are  20 cities in Finland that each have a larger population than the entire region of Keski-Pohjamaa.

He had more questions to which he would want answers from the new reform policy makers. The municipalities own real estates and if the responsibilities for health care are transferred from them to the autonomous regions, will the latter purchase those properties from the municipalities? If so, will they pay the market price? How to arrange it so that nobody suffers because of the responsibilities being taken away from the municipalities?

The role of the Universities of Applied Sciences as reformers of welfare and well-being services

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Katariina Raij, PhD, Laurea

Director Katariina Raij of Laurea University of Applied Sciences had an innovative approach: as soon as a new innovation appears, new training/studies should be made available swiftly. Otherwise, we won´t utilize the innovative ideas properly. The innovation should be quickly introduced to the markets, there are lots of innovative technologies that were never applied. How do we bring agility into the process of innovation? When thinking about health care in the public sector, it is an industry focused on curing diseases, and the whole system is based on illnesses not health.  The research findings of the JADE project 2014, Active and Healthy Ageing Report 2011, Special Euro Barometer 378 and Digi Barometer 2014 show that technology is very poorely utilized in solving  the problems of the public sector.

In order to be internationaly “visible”, it is important to invest in high-level development and know-how. Finland has a reputation of being slow in putting new health technology innovations into use in the health care sector. Finland is also very careful when approaching new innovations because of the risk of conflicts of interest. That prevents the creation of partnerships between the private and the public sector which are very important especially for the health care system. Insufficient revision of regulations and standards delays the entrance of innovations into the markets by months or even years.

She praised the new National Curriculum that is currently being drafted by the Finnish National Board of Education. She called the new curriculum fantastic, with the mindset the children will acquire and the way in which they will perceive the future. As of 2019, there will be a freedom of choice among public, private and third sector health service providers. How does the client recognize the best quality? How do we help clients make good choices? The question is: Do we need a new college degree/ complementary educational training in service navigation/ guidance?

 

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The Well Life Center of Laurea created a research project called HyvinvointiTV (CaringTV) . The HyvinvointiTV’s studio was built in the Well Life Center with professionals offering individual guidance and advisory services that were co-created with clients. The aim of the interactive HyvinvointiTV was to support the health and well-being of elderly people living independently in their own homes. At that time, the founders of course had no idea how fast the e-services would develop. HyvinvointiTV was a pioneer in robotics. The award-winning service gained a lot of attention all around the world. The clients claimed that the screen felt so real they felt as if they had invited guests to their homes.

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Care Innovation and Design (CIDe) was founded in 2010 in collaboration between Laurea and Vantaan Innovaatioinstituutti Oy (Innovation Institute of Vantaa, Inc.). CIDe sees itself as an innovation environment with an emphasis on advancing health  and well-being, supporting self-care and enabling customer-centeredness in all research and development activities. At the moment CIDe is owned by Laurea only. Care Innovation and Design as such doesn´t exist in any other University of Applied Sciences in Finland.

 

Jana Arhio, Laurea

Collectively ‘Thinking Design’

..my experience..
Starting studies after a decade…years of work life and now back again to a student life!

Was not sure what to expect and get from the SID master’s program starting on the morning of 4th September 2015 with ‘Design Thinking’

A very exciting day to begin, students around full of inspiration, motivated, energized and from various backgrounds. Getting to know and learn from each other all about the concept of Design Thinking was the essence of the two-day workshop held by guest lecturers Katja Tschimmel and Mariana Valença.

An interesting ice breaker for the team was the ‘mind shake warm-up’ and ‘who is who’ activities. Learnt a lot of new things not only on the subject but also about other students as well as myself! That’s when I realized that it is going to be an exciting learning journey ahead!

 Mind Shake game

Ice breaker – Mind Shake game

 who is who

Group exercise – who is who

..my knowledge..
Why design thinking?

Design Thinking is a way of thinking which leads to transformation, evolution and innovation. Tschimmel, K. (2012) it is human-centric approach which starts with observing people in their natural surroundings, helps to understand customer’s actual needs and create business that taps into their existing behavior. This way customers are much more likely to relate to the new business.

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#Generate, #dream, #take risks, #inspire

Design Thinking offers a variety of new ways to accelerate the creative process. During the first contact session at the SID program we were immersed in the world of Design Thinking with an intense two-day workshop held by guest lecturers Katja Tschimmel and Mariana Valença.

BRAINSTORMING is a widely spread idea generation tool that can be extremely effective when conducted appropriately. As explained in Katja’s article Design Thinking as an effective Toolkit for Innovation, brainstorming is a participatory idea generation session, which is done without discussing the ideas or thinking them through to the end. The main goal is to generate a myriad of ideas in a short period of time, being emotions and intuition more important that rational thinking.

The process

Team members start generating new ideas in complete SILENCE. Each of the members write down their ideas on post-it notes and sticks them on the wall (see Fig. 1). After a while, participants start elaborating on the other ideas. The goal is that an idea of one participant can be a source of inspiration for another. Brainstorming is a good technique to generate ideas that the whole group feels ownership of.

Brainstorming session SID

Fig. 1 Brainstorming session during the DT workshop

While reading the book The Innovation Expedition I was introduced to the spiritual father of the brainstorming technique, the American Alex Osborn. From him I learned two essential rules when brainstorming – ‘Defer your judgment’ and ‘go for quantity’. The underlying assumption of brainstorming is that people are scared of saying something wrong.

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The Course for Human-Centered Design: How Might We Enable More Young People to Become Social Entrepreneurs?

The Course for Human-Centered Design (provided by Ideo.org and +Acumen) is a seven-week curriculum, which introduces the concepts of human-centered design and how this approach can be used to create innovative, effective, and sustainable solutions for social change.  This course has been developed to educate those, who are brand new to human-centered design. No prior experience is required. However, I would recommend this course for anyone looking to improve their human-centered design skills.

What is Human-Centered Design? 

Human-Centered Design (HCD) is a creative approach to solve any kind of problem. The process starts with the people for whom the solution is designed; and ends with e.g. new product or service that is tailor-made to suit these people’s needs. HCD is all about building a deep empathy with the people’s needs and motivations, generating a lot of ideas, creating prototypes, sharing the ideas and solutions with the people; and eventually taking the new innovative solution out in the world. Please see the below video describing the concept of HCD.

Our team and design challenge

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