Archive by Author | ekaterinazhiteneva

Design (f)or Value in Service Business?

SID Seminar

© SID Seminar illustration by Jane Vita

The 5th annual Service Innovation and Design seminar was held on the 14th of March in Laurea Leppävaara, Espoo. The focus of this year’s seminar was continuous value creation for customers. The seminar was also the closing seminar of TEKES funded projects CoCo and ServChange carried out together by Laurea and VTT.

During the day, we had a chance to work with many interesting people from the industry, service design practitioners, researchers, business people, and service design students, and learn from each other’s experiences on co-creation in service business.

Check the full program of the seminar here.

During the seminar day, there were 13 different parallel workshops and paper presentations running and we could choose to participate in the sessions we were interested.

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Service Design Breakfast #7, Reima Rönnholm, Palmu Inc.

Figure 1. How to Fail in Service Design, Palmu 2012

The last Service Design Breakfast was not about digital design, but more human-centric services. Reima Rönnholm started his presentation by asking everyone if they have already failed in anything this week or this day. Failing isn’t really fun, but what can we learn from failing? Reima quoted Steve Blank saying that no business plan survives first contact with a customer. Making mistakes is inevitable and the key is how to do it successfully.

The first successful example of designing a service was service design process of Helsinki Airport. Making the most painful points a pleasant experience and suggesting it to customers as a service, not something they are forced to use. What really make any service are processes, people and customers. Places and materials are always there, but the service is not unless there are people using it. You have to do lots of modeling to make an intangible service concrete. You have to try and make errors to see how to make things work.

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Service Design Breakfast #2 – Mikko-Pekka Hanski, Idean

Figure 1. Service Design Breakfast, Idean 2012

How do emotions impact the design? How can design projects benefit from understanding the emotional rollercoaster? How can you become a better designer if you are aware of the changes in emotions throughout a project? How can you adjust your project plan based on that? In this blogpost you will find out how analyzing your emotions can help your project.

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Design Thinking: The Journey of Group 5

Design is a central feature of our everyday life. But what is it? How do you define a good design solution?  Is it about aesthetics, quality or functionality? How do you develop the creative process and when can you consider yourself a designer?

The discussions, lectures and exercises during the Design Thinking course were aimed at helping us answer all these questions. We were provided with different tools and methods to develop ourselves as designers and contribute to creation of new services.


Researching for inspiration & Benchmarking

The first group exercise started during the first contact session. The theme selected by our group was “Services for Museums” and we had to identify the problems of the current service offering and design new solutions. In groups of 5-6 people, we brainstormed on problems and possible solutions during the first contact day. As our first course assignment, we were asked to research the services that exist on the market, how they are represented in Finland and abroad, and how the services or lack of them affect potential consumers’ daily life.

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Book Review: Mobile Service Innovation and Business Models

Current trends that shape the western economies are the growing importance of services, the need for innovation, changes in consumer and business markets, and the advancements in information and communication technology. Technological developments like the digitalization of information, the increased processing capacity of computer chips, miniaturization and increased mobility of devices, the use of sensors and location technologies, increased interoperability between services, security, and natural interfaces (Brouwman, Van den Hooff, Van de Wijngaert, & Van Dijk, 2005) enable mature architectures and platforms for knowledge sharing, collaboration, and electronic commerce transactions, anywhere, anytime.

Nowadays development of the new innovative services is an important driver for economic growth. In the book Mobile Service Innovation and Business Models, the authors present a theoretically grounded yet practical approach to designing business models for electronic services, including mobile ones. The book consists of two parts.

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