Archive by Author | Annar12

Employee Experience at Tieto

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I attended a talk about Tieto’s employee experience this week and it was very inspiring to learn how Tieto make use of Jacob Morgan’s thoughts on employee experience to strive to be the best on the market for both employees and external customers.

Jacob Morgan is the father of the Employee Experience Equation, which essentially means the combination of technology, physical space and culture that create the employee experience. Tieto have adopted this model to create their employee experience, something that plays a crucial role at Tieto to not only to hire and retain the best talent, but also as based on their own research, it directly translates to the customer experience.

This was very interesting to learn as even though the topic was employee experience, the customers were put at the heart of the service. Even though internal customers are just as important as the external ones, we often tend to design services with the external customers in mind first, but should not forget the impact an organisation’s internal customers (i.e. employees) have on the value that customers create.

The Employee Experience Equation in practice

As Morgan discusses, the employee experience boils down to 3 areas. At Tieto, these mean the following:

Technology

Having the best technology in use that makes working more efficient. When new technology is being considered, the employees are interviewed to increase buy-in. Data privacy and security also plays a big role as Tieto employees are experts in this, the same standard is required from the technology choices.

Physical space

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One of the best-known examples of the physical space within the employee experience at Tieto is the Empathic Building which can be experienced in the Keilaniemi offices. The Empathic Building allows a completely new way of interacting with your colleagues from finding their location based on tags they wear (all voluntary so if an employee feels like they don’t want to be tracked, they don’t have to) to seeing which rooms and desks are free. But the physical space is a lot more, there are a variety of spaces employees can choose from depending on what their day looks like (from quiet spaces to group working areas or even areas meant just for relaxing). There is also an in-house Support Centre where anyone can get help with their IT or healthcare, which is one of the key areas that Tieto employees feel is important.

Culture

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With over 15,000 employees globally, creating a culture of inclusion has been very important. The aim of Tieto culture is for everyone to feel included, valued, respected and heard which is achieved by celebrating diversity and bringing employees from different locations together, either digitally or physically. There are, for example, several Tieto Communities where likeminded people can network within the company and learn from each other.

 
Tieto are continuously investing in their employee experience and it was great to hear how they have utilised the Employee Experience Equation. If you ever get the chance to visit the Tieto offices, I can warmly recommend them as it serves as a nice inspiration for what employee experience can look like.

Nokia at Helsinki Design Week: Innovation in an enterprise

As part of Helsinki Design Week this year, Nokia spoke about the role innovation plays in Nokia’s present and future. It was exciting to learn how Design Thinking can have a big impact on the whole organisation. In this blog post, I share my favourite takeaways from the talk.

 

A small design team can make a difference

 

Would you believe it if I told you that Nokia currently sports a team of 19  in-house designers? At Nokia’s peak, they had over 600. I thought 19 sounded a pretty small number seeing the size of the company, but it goes to show that you don’t necessarily need a huge design team to innovate as long as you’re organised correctly (see my next point about multidisciplinary teams)

Innovate in multidisciplinary teams

With over 110,000 employees globally, innovation could get lost in the organisational structures. However, Nokia have really made an effort to ensure there are no such barriers to innovation. In every innovation project, a multi-disciplinary team is formed from the Design team, Business and Engineers.

The design process starts with a collaboration between the different teams from day one. The Product Development Lifecycle is followed and every stage needs to be agreed by all 3 groups to move forward. As all decisions are discussed within the multidisciplinary group meaning there is not only internal buy-in, but the maximum value from the different skill sets available in the group (think designers meet engineers etc.)

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Using Design Thinking to Build a VR Study Experience

What do you get when you put together a group of Laurea MBA in Service Innovation and Design students and Mindshake’s Katja Tschimmel and task the group to innovate a service for international students as part of the Design Thinking course? A crazy lot of innovation, creativity, collaboration, and learnings. In this blog post, I will go through how one group utilised Design Thinking to create a service offering a full in-class VR experience to anyone not physically present.

Everyone has creativity in them – uncovering our creative confidence

First, we learned the theory and about the toolkit for practical Design Thinking, including opportunity mind mapping, intent statement and insight and stakeholder maps.

As innovation starts with idea generation, these tools were great for uncovering creativity and helped narrow down our focus. IDEO’s Tom and David Kelley discuss in their book Creative confidence: unleashing the creative potential within us all (Crown Publishing Group, 2013) how everyone has creativity in them and these tools are a testament to that. For our team, the creative confidence was really built up by brainwriting which brought us the collective brainchild of creating a VR in-class experience from anywhere.

Brainwriting

Fluency and flexibility demonstrated during the brainwriting exercise which finally lead us to cluster the ideas that had to do with VR

Presenting the prototype

Then it was the time to create a prototype to visually present the concept. This concept test gave us invaluable feedback from the other team which we then incorporated in the service (it was great that we had to listen to the feedback in silence as there was only the feedback, no defending of what we thought – making us concentrate on just what people want and need in their lives, also highlighted of importance by IDEO’s CEO Tim Brown in HBR back in 2008).

VRprototype

A prototype of the VR in-class experience

 

The real test and the permission to fail

Then we moved on to the service blueprint which proved to be a bit more difficult than our team had thought. Now was the time we actually had to answer some tough questions and we realised that we may not have actually gathered all the information we thought we did.

In real life, we would have taken a few steps back and interviewed international students (and other stakeholders), and possibly decided that this service was not viable. Failure was an option, but for the sake of the learning experience, we decided to come up with some of the answers. Tom and David Kelley also discuss in their book Creative confidence: unleashing the creative potential within us all about the “permission to fail” which essentially means that you have to learn to embrace failure to come up with better innovations. For us, the service blueprint demonstrated well that failure is part of the innovation process and not something to be afraid of.

ServiceBlueprintVR

Pitch perfect innovation and collaboration

We were then ready to pitch our innovation using storytelling. Overall, the tools really gave the framework for innovation, directing us to the goal of being able to pitch a concept.

What was also remarkable was how well we collaborated, even though we barely knew each other. Tim Brown also states in his HBR article from 2008 that the best Design Thinkers are not just experts in their own discipline but have experience from others. After working in a truly multidisciplinary team, I can fully see how much innovation benefits.

What do you think, how has your experience with practical Design Thinking been?