#Snapshots and Service Design

Browsing through a mountain of photos.

Browsing through a mountain of photos.

“I’m walking over a pile of 900 000 photos representing an amount of photos loaded daily to Flickr, image hosting website. It feels weird to step on photos, on someone’s face, on a cute baby, a guitar… I don’t think I have ever done this before, not in a photography exhibition at least”.

That was part of my customer journey through The Finnish Museum of Photography’s #snapshot exhibition that was co-designed with Futurice, and with help of Tampere University and Aalto University. Risto Sarvas from Futurice and Anna-Kaisa Rastenberger from the museum presented their case for the Service Design Achievements 2015. This was also the last Service Design Breakfast of this year, and what a great way it was to end it at the Finnish Museum of Photography.

 

Service design challenge

The service design challenge with #snapshot exhibition was to turn culture into something that people can walk into and have an interactive physical experience. The #snapshot exhibition’s objective is to explore how the Internet and digitalization has changed contemporary photographic culture. As you all probably know there’s a large amount of photo sharing websites and applications, and everybody’s basically carrying a camera with them in their smartphones.

Futurice was really up to this challenge, as they wanted to design for public good purposes and make a social impact. And of course it was also a very interesting design challenge. It was different from their typical project as there’s no technical platform, no clear organizational structure in museum, no existing solutions, no business drivers, and no ready brand.

Anna-Kaisa and Risto presenting #snapshot.

Anna-Kaisa and Risto presenting #snapshot.

Walking on a photomountain.

Walking on a photomountain.

 

 

 

How to tackle the challenge?

The whole process started approximately a year ago. The team realized that they couldn’t start with a typical design research and needed help from Academia (Tampere University and Aalto University) resources who had been researching photography for years. Then of course co-operation with the museum was needed, as they are the experts in organizing exhibitions. First of all, interviews were conducted, and after the interviewing process became the ideation and concept phase, followed by designing and finally building the exhibition, which opened in August 2014.

After interviews nine different profiles of people aged 13-52 were created. Then nine target visitor profiles were created. The team wanted to consider how to make it a rich, coherent experience. Through service design process team used tools such as brainstorming, Lego blueprint, working on paper, making prototypes, and building customer journeys. With prototyping they tested customer feelings and emotions by making an exhibition about people’s private photos and by observing their reactions. Futurice also build a mini customer journey of the exhibition in their office so they could test how the journey actually worked in practice.

 

#duckfacing

#duckface, #flexing, #meitsie…

Why do I take photos -wall.

Why do I take photos -wall.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The end result; #snapshot exhibition

The end result is an interesting and interactive exhibition about the ongoing cultural change in photography field. The exhibition is about the photographs we all capture and share. It’s also about snapshots of tragedies and snapshots with political impacts. Additionally, the exhibition includes contemporary artwork by Catherine Balet, Erik Kessels, Niklas Kullström, and Sisse Stroyer.

After the presentation we had an opportunity to take a journey through the exhibition guided by Risto Sarvas. The photos on this blogpost, honoring the spirit of the exhibition, are snapshots from my iPhone captured during the journey. My snapshots might have shortly flashed through the real time Instagram feed wall at the exhibition. What’s more, I even learned a couple of new terms like #vadering and #meitsie. It’s good to learn something new every day :)

 

Taking a closer look at Niklas Kullström’s artwork at the exhibition.

Taking a closer look at Niklas Kullström’s artwork at the exhibition.

Risto from Futurice guiding us through the exhibition.

Risto from Futurice guiding us through the exhibition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The #snapshot exhibition is open at the Finnish Museum of Photography until 18th of January 2015, so you still have a chance to check it out before it goes on tour to Germany! You also have a chance to view the whole presentation here.

 

Written and snapshots by Heini Kauppinen, SID Student

Creating a Service Design Concept for FORGE Service Lab

(c) FORGE Service Lab

(c) FORGE Service Lab

A couple of months ago our SID 2014 group started the courses New Service Development and Innovative Business Models, as well as Deep Customer Insights Through Ethnographic Research. As learning by developing is the key in this Master degree program we were about to get hands on with a real life research and service development process. The case company we got an assignment from was DIGILE, more specifically their FORGE Service Lab.

What are DIGILE and FORGE Service Lab?

DIGILE is the Center for Science, Technology and Innovation (SHOK) focusing on Internet economy and related technologies and business. You can learn more about DIGILE from their website.

FORGE Service Lab has been created to accelerate the digitalization of services in Finland. It is a development laboratory, where digital services can be created. The video below shows an illustration of the journey that FORGE Service Lab can offer to the world of digitalized services.

Working on the assignment

We were divided into teams of five and the task was to create a customer value proposition and service design support concept for FORGE Lab. We started our assignment in October’s contact session by staring to analyze the current state of FORGE Service Lab, and we also had the opportunity to discuss with DIGILE’s two representatives. After the classes each of us was to conduct an interview with a current or potential FORGE Service Lab customer.

After the interviews we continued our work in teams in November’s contact session. Based on our customer insight findings it was time to have an interactive workshop using the CoCo Tool Kit, which is a collection of tools and a workbook designed to support service businesses in adapting co-creation activities. I actually wish we had had more time exploring with the CoCo Tool Kit. If you would like to know more about the tool kit please check these pages.

In November’s workshop we also worked on creating a Service-Logic Based Business Model Canvas for FORGE Service Lab. Service-Logic Business Model Canvas is a modification of the most popular business model framework and takes into account the service logic principles (Ojasalo & Ojasalo 2014). The purpose was to clarify the value proposition and redesign the service concept. We were to reflect on what could be the valuable service design support that FORGE offers to its customers. It was challenging I must say, as we also had to consider a systematic and efficient approach that enables creation of innovative, global services and raises the Finnish competence level towards leading position. Below is a picture of how our canvas looked after the workshop, so we still had a lot be accomplished and refined.

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Develop fast – use Lean method!

I wrote in my earlier blog that innovation processes take time. If you want to develop a really innovative – and a radical – new service, you need time. According to FORTH innovation method an average time for an innovation development process is 16-20 weeks. http://www.toolshero.com/forth-innovation-method/

However, definition of innovation is tricky. This we learned during the Design Thinking course at Laurea University of Applied Sciences. Our lecturer showed us pictures of products and asked us to tell if they were innovations or not. Some pictures got equal amount of “yes” and “no” votes. A very common definition is that an innovation is a new product, process, service or an invention. But, an innovation can also be something that is already been used somewhere for some time; if it is a new process, a new way of doing something for a specific target group, then it can be an innovation for that specific group!

So the difference between an innovation and a new service or a product is small. And marketers take a full advantage of this and call almost every new product or a service an innovation.

As stated earlier, innovation processes take time – and so does the traditional product or service development processes. There is however a faster way to create new products and services as we learned in “New Service Development and Innovative Business Models” course at Laurea. That is called the Lean method.

Lean-Canvas
Lean canvas.

 LEAN METHOD

The Lean method has its origins in the 90s and in Toyota’s manufacturing system called “Lean manufacturing”. The word “Lean” suggest that elements that do not create value should be decreased or eliminated in the business process.

Instead of traditional business plans the Lean method highlights making hypothesis -> summarizing the hypothesis in a business model canvas -> creating a minimum viable product -> asking feedback from the customers -> failing fast -> starting the development cycle all over again. In addition to the business model canvas, a particular lean canvas was developed.

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Diagonal brought yoga to the airport

Have you ever get bored at the airport while waiting for the connection flight? Would you like to use your idle time for relaxing yoga or have a cup of coffee at the gate served from coffee bicycle?

19th of November Service Design Breakfast took place at Diagonals´ office at Punavuori. Kirsikka Vaajakallio and Jaakko Wäänänen from design agency Diagonal presented their Travellab case with SID Master’s student Juha Vasko from Finavia.

Juha Vasko, Kirsikka Vaajakallio and Jaakko Wäänänen

Juha Vasko, Kirsikka Vaajakallio and Jaakko Wäänänen

Travellab project started with a positive problem. Vasko told that Finavia had over 200 service ideas from the passengers how to enhance the customer experience at the airports. Because Finavia did not have a system to proceed with the ideas they asked for Diagonals´ help.

Diagonal created a concept called Travellab. Travellab was an effective, reliable and experimental model for testing ideas affecting and improving the transfer passengers experience at Helsinki airport. Over 200 ideas were categorized and prioritizes through “Idea funnel” 12 of them were prototyped and tested. All the prototypes e.g. restaurant day and yoga gate were tested in the real life and context with Finavias´ customers.

"Idea funnel"

“Idea funnel”

I interviewed Kirsikka Vaajakallio about the Travellab project.

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Travellab: A Creative Concept for Developing Services at Helsinki Airport

Helsinki Airport (picture from Finavia).

Helsinki Airport (picture from Finavia).

 

What could make airport service experience more pleasurable for transfer passengers? Well, you could get some ideas as Kirsikka Vaajakallio and Jaakko Wäänänen from Diagonal, as well as Juha Vasko from Finavia presented their Travellab project at Service Design Breakfast last week. Diagonal’s Travellab is also a candidate for Service Design Achievement 2015 in Finland.

 

 

What Travellab?

Diagonal created the Travellab concept, which is a model for testing ideas at the airport. More precisely it’s a model for rapid prototyping and idea ranking created for Finavia to improve the transfer experience at Helsinki Airport. It’s also a great example of using service design tools and design thinking in a creative way to develop services.

 

Diagonal and Finavia presenting Travellab.

Diagonal and Finavia presenting Travellab.

Background of the project

Starting point for the project was Finavia’s strategy to make the Helsinki airport the most desired transit travel airport and to support this goal the Travellab was created. The project started with a positive problem as Finavia had been gathering service ideas during the years and already had 200+ existing ideas for enhancing the customer experience at the airport. However, some help was needed and the brief for Diagonal was to design a model for Finavia for prototyping and validating ideas in a consistent way. It had to be taken into consideration that transfer passengers spend relatively short amount of time at the airport, approximately 1,5h.

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4 interesting things I learned from service productisation

If Video-on-phonesomebody had said in 1984 that he had a vision of people watching Formula 1 from their phones in 2014, he would have been considered mentally ill. In 1994 he could have been hired into a start-up-firm going bankrupt later that year. In 2004 this idea had already landed on Steve Jobs’ office desk. And now in 2014 it’s part of our everyday life! In the end it was all about daring to think in a new way.

I was intrigued to take part in Aalto University’s seminar about Leadership in the productisation of services (LEAPS) a couple of weeks ago. The closing seminar showcased results of the LEAPS –project   that had lasted two years. The project focused on identifying and developing open and customer-driven methods for service productisation. LEAPS-project was carried out in collaboration between Aalto University, Tampere University of Technology and Innotiimi Oy.

Here are the 4 most interesting things I learned during the afternoon:

Everything can be viewed as a service

The keynote speaker, professor Anders Gustafsson from Service Research Center in Karlstad University, Sweden had a really interesting presentation. He talked a lot about service logic and that service is a perspective on value creation. The most important thing is to focus on value-in-use, especially on co-creation of value. He also concluded that everything can be viewed as a service. This was something we all agreed with, after hearing that already 70-80% of our GDP is service related. The service sector is constantly growing as traditionally goods based companies are starting to rely more on the service part of their business.

Big change: yShowroomingou have to get the customers to pay for the services

Anders Gustafsson also talked about companies traditionally giving services for free to sell products. This can generally be considered as a big problem. The companies have to make a transformation: customers have to start paying for the services. As a solution to this problem, Gustafsson mentioned bronze, silver and gold levels for customers as an example. You have to find a way to make the service part somehow visible to the customer.

5 steps for successful productisation workshops

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Building Mobile Wallet Pivo

The series in the Service Design Breakfast (#SDA15) continued with an exciting topic on November 5th, when OP-Pohjola, the largest national bank in Finland, and design company Nordkapp presented how they designed and developed the Mobile Wallet Pivo – one of the most successful banking applications in Finland.

Pivo Wallet has an intuitive and simple UI.

Pivo Wallet has an intuitive and simple UI.

What is Pivo?

Pivo is a digital wallet application for smart phones. With an intuitive and simple UI, it offers an easy way for customers to glance at their account balance, while simultaneously viewing their purchase history and an estimate for future spending based on their buying habits. It helps customers to be in control of their daily spending and to know what they can afford. Pivo has also integrated loyalty programs into the service offering, such as PINS and Cityshoppari, enabling the customer to find offers and coupons based on their interest and location. Thus, Pivo is a platform for mobile payments, focusing on the purchase moment, before and after the actual payment. The aim has been to develop one common brand for other partners and banks to build on.

Continuous feedback from the customers

A Lean UX design process was used to develop Pivo Wallet, with the continuous circle of thinking, iterating and measuring. Customers have been involved throughout the entire design process. Actually they were involved already before the concrete concept was defined. Feedback was asked from customers based on a vague idea using a video prototype communicating the concept thinking. A lot of qualitative and quantitative user research was made already in the beginning of the process. The hypotheses were validated with interviews, demos, usability tests as well as private alpha and public beta tests. Pivo also has an active user base providing continuous feedback and improvement ideas via Facebook, Twitter and email.

Lean UX process was used to develop Pivo Wallet.

Lean UX design process was used to develop Pivo Wallet.

The UI is the actual product

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